Dulux London Revolution

What.A.Weekend

Waking up at 4am on Saturday morning, nerves and excitement set in, trying to force down overnight oats while triple checking that we had everything we needed. We hit the road by 4:30am, I’ve never seen the London roads so quiet.

The whole experience was new to me having never taken part in a cycle event of any kind, so I was in amazement when we pulled in to the field to park the car watching what looked like professional cyclists everywhere getting their bikes ready, pumping up tyres, fitting inner tubes and attaching their numbers to their bikes. As we registered it suddenly felt real. I’d been waiting for that feeling all week, even travelling down to London still didn’t feel real. 187 miles was a distance that I couldn’t quite appreciate or get my head around. Receiving the registration pack was when it suddenly hit me. As I was looking around taking in the atmosphere I couldn’t help but notice that I was yet to see any women cyclists, automatically I started to worry that all the men around me looked particularly hard core and ready for what lies ahead.

My bike was ready, my luggage was gone and my water bottles were filled. I was at the start line listening to the safety talk and then before I really knew what was going on my wave were clipping in and we were off. I don’t think I’ll forget that initial feeling, the first time in my life that I was cycling in a group with other people. I felt like I was learning to ride for the first time and I actually felt wobbly. It was just nerves and within a mile I found my feet but I couldn’t help but notice that these roads were not closed, they were very much open and extremely busy. 

Riding in London itself was an experience, every traffic light turned red as we approached and I got lots of practice at clipping out. When we started the ride we were given a sticker to go on the bike setting out the main climbs and pit stops. Being the girl who thought the route was flat was a little confused but accepted that there would be a few ‘hills’. Everywhere has a few hills. What this ride has taught me is that in cycling there is actually a difference between a hill and a climb. 

The ride started in North London, through Shoreditch and Stoke Newingham, crossing the iconic Tower Bridge was a highlight all the way to the first climb up to Crystal Palace, I knew then that this ride was going to be a test. 

Reaching the first pit stop at mile 34 felt good, I’d settled in to the ride and had got used to riding in a group of people, learning the etiquette and enjoying myself. The first stop was great, a chance to stretch the legs and refuel. Refuelling. This is something that I hadn’t quite mastered while training and I did feel a little nervous that I didn’t have a nutrition plan. It was then that I discovered Perkier, a great brand that makes breakfast and snacks out of whole foods. I had never tried the snack bars before but they quickly became my favourite. A sprouted oaty cranberry bar and banana along with more water was just what I needed to get me through the next 34 miles. Off we went making our way to the next pit stop, strong winds, pretty views and steep climbs but 34 miles later we stopped for lunch (and I must admit another perkier bar!).

Mile 64 and I was feeling positive still, I had some self doubt but could see the end in sight. A big error I made on this ride was about to unveil as I took on the final part of the ride. Dehydration. I definitely didn’t drink enough while out riding and this is something I struggled with throughout training but when I got to mile 87 I started to really struggle. My legs had nothing left, I felt dehydrated and light headed. But I kept spinning the legs and pushing forwards. The finish line was in sight and it felt amazing to cross it. The atmosphere at Windsor racecourse was fab! 

That night I met the Dulux dog and then chilled out in the chill out area before retiring to ‘bed’ for the night. Anyone who knows me knows that I’m not made for camping, especially after cycling 102 miles, all I wanted was a nice comfy hotel room but I was here to finish a race not a night of luxury. Needless to say it was a sleepless night, having spent 3 hours chugging water to try and ease the dehydration I also had to get up every hour and find my way to the portaloo and then find my way back again… not so easy when all the tents look the same!  

5am Saturday morning and the rain was pouring down, sore legs, head cold on its way I had to reason with myself. Mr cycling buddy next door also woke up feeling poorly and extremely sore and for a few minutes I did wonder how the day would end. We were proud of cycling 100 miles, an achievement that neither of us had achieved before. But that wasn’t enough. We looked at each other and knew what the other was thinking. We are finishing this race.

We turned up at the start line and perhaps that was the hardest step, the motivation and energy around us was enough to make us forget the uncomfortable feelings we had. Sitting back on the bike and pedalling was painful and my bum was hurting from the offset, something to do with my piriformis injury I expect but every bump sent stabbing pains through me. It was going to be a long day.

I settled in and tried to get comfortable but there was nothing comfortable about it, the climbs were relentless and started early, we were exploring the chilterns filled with painful long climbs, beautiful views and fast descents. The descents made me nervous as almost each one ended with another climb. Pit stop one was most welcome and I was doubting myself, I was in pain and completely blind to what was to come. Texts from my mum telling me I could do it and positive messages from my sister along with so much support from friends and family on Facebook and Twitter. That is what got me through, so many people were watching and so many people where willing me on and to finish there was no way that I could stop now. I had people following my journey and waiting for me to get the finish. I was going to finish. 

The next part of the ride was the hilliest and hardest of all, I think it was the most challenging 2 hours of my life, one hill made me sick, one made me cry but I was determined to get to the top of each. My family have been through some challenging times and thinking about these gave me to strength and determination when I needed it most. 

I know my family must have thought I was crazy when I told them I was cycling 187 miles (you can’t even ride on the road yet) and I know they may have secretly doubted me during training but they supported me none the less. Every pedal of the way and that’s what got me through.

When things got really tough I played mind games with myself, I thought about problems that needed to be solved and I learnt a lot about myself.

I wasn’t a cyclist before I started, I wouldn’t ride my bike outside as I was scared of roundabouts and junctions. I was resistant to clip in cycling shoes in case I couldn’t clip out fast enough. The training has been tough and there have been challenges along the way, rides early on a Sunday morning over winter in the freezing cold, heavy winds, self doubts, hitting 50 miles and questioning whether I can go any further, missed workouts due to illness, endless anxiety and several times considering not doing it and exhaustion. There have also been beautiful Sunday morning rides in the sunshine, discovering new coffee shops, cycling over to my parents house, achieving new goals and personal bests, smilies, laughs, proud moments, bringing my new bike in to my life and pushing my body further than it has ever been before. It’s been a journey of highs and lows, and I’d do it all again for those 60 seconds of feeling amazing crossing the finish line. 

The Dulux London Revolution is an amazing event. The organisation, support and atmosphere are second to none.

Thank you to Stolen Goat for my cycling kit, I felt like a proper cyclist stood at the start line with my kit.

Thank you to Perkier Foods for introducing me to the best energy snacks I have ever had. A new food that will become part of my everyday training! Also to High 5 for the electrolyte drinks, they too made all the difference. 

Let’s not forget the reason I did this event, after being lucky enough to win entry I decided to raise money for The Shakespeare Hospice a charity we are working closely with at work. Thank you to everyone who helped me raise £605 for such a great cause.

I hope that I can show that you really can do anything you put your mind to. I wasn’t a cyclist before I started and I doubted  myself throughout but if you want to achieve something then you are your only barrier. More is in you.

A weekend I will never ever forget.

The ultimate question, would I ever do it again? 

What do you think 😉


M x 
https://stolengoat.com/
http://perkier.co.uk/
http://www.london-revolution.com/
http://www.giant-leamington.co.uk/en-GB/
https://www.theshakespearehospice.org.uk/
https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Michelle-Mumford3

Dulux London Revolution

Running through April

Excuse the pun. I do feel as though I literally ran through April in the sense that it’s another month that has just disappeared in a blink of the eye.

In training terms April has been a good month. I don’t want to write ‘May’ because as we enter May tomorrow that means I have just 12 days before I am driving down to London ready for the London Revolution cycle! 

My focus for London Revolution this month was to keep increasing the long Sunday ride along with slightly shorter rides on Saturdays, to ensure I was conditioning my muscles really for consecutive days cycling. My longest ride was 129km and I finished this ride feeling strong and felt as though there were still some miles left in me. This helped boost my confidence for London slightly but still feel anxious (and slightly nauseous) when I think about it.

I started to focus some attention on my running training plan to, it’s crazy to think that I have signed up to Gloucester Marathon in August. The cycling has taken most of my attention and focus and balancing the two is difficult. Gloucester doesn’t feel real yet.

Who watched the London Marathon? One of the biggest events in the running world. Who watched the marathon and thought “actually I could do that”? I hold my hand up. So many people from all different backgrounds crossed that start line, and finish line. 

My heart and attention was particularly with those running for the charity ‘Heads Together’ for the programme Mind Over Marathon. The programme resonates with me deeply and I have personally experienced the benefits of running and mental health. I liked how they focused on showing mental health as part of someone’s life, not all encompassing and not in a way that negative stigma is attached. Many people experience mental health struggles be it depression, anxiety, OCD or many others but it doesn’t and shouldn’t define you and you can function and live a normal life. You can carry on with family life, work hard at your career and personal commitments, it’s just a whole lot harder.

Running can help on so many levels from giving structure and routine, the need to fuel your body properly and look after yourself to get the most of your running. It offers a distraction, a place to find space in your mind and feel free. It floods your body with endorphins, that ‘runners high’ that can make you feel better about yourself. It also allows you to do something that you can achieve great things in, whether that is your first 5km, half marathon or full marathon. You can see yourself improving and it gives you worth.

I’m doing Gloucester Marathon in August, initially I thought about doing it for charity. Not only is raining money for charity an amazing thing to do but it also adds some responsibilities to the run. People have sponsored you so you have to go out there and finish. A marathon is a long long way, one that I don’t know if I can do and so the added motivation that people have sponsored me would have been a big help. But when I stopped and thought about exactly why I want to run a marathon (and was completely honest with myself) the reasons are exactly the same as all of those people on Mind Over Marathon (and probably thousands of others who ran London). I want to run Gloucester Marathon for me. I want to show myself that I can do it, that I am strong enough and that my anxiety and confidence issues that I often face about many situations is not going to stop me from getting to the start line. It will be 14 weeks of ‘lessons to learn’, ups and downs of training and battling negative thoughts that tell me I can’t do it, but the only thing that will stand between me and my finishers medal is injury, a genuine reason.

So back to cycling. May will be knocking at the door tomorrow and the countdown will begin. The next week will be a hard training week and then it will ease off slightly until the big day. Next time I write my monthly review it will be done and hopefully I will have an amazing story to tell.

That’s all for now.

M x

Running through April

To Bib, or not to Bib that is the question?

I am no professional, I actually consider myself an amateur, a newbie, a novice. But one lesson I learnt pretty swiftly is that whatever your level, if you are planning on spending a decent time in the saddle never underestimate the importance of bib shorts… lovely padded bib shorts.

When I first started riding, or should I say when I first thought about riding I bought a pair of bib shorts, I didn’t research them but they were in the sale and I thought I might need them, so I bought them. I wore them once and that was that. They didn’t feel much different to wearing my running tights if I am completely honest. Then when I was lucky enough to win entry into the London Revolution I realised that;

a) I was going to have to start taking my training seriously 

b) I was actually going to have to get on my road bike, on the road (no more hiding on the turbo in the comfort of my home) 

c) It was winter, it was cold and I was going to need appropriate bib tights. 

The ones I decided on (after limited research) were OK, but being a newbie I wasn’t 100% sure how I was meant to feel after a long ride, my bum still hurt after getting off the saddle and the longer the rides became the more I felt as though I was becoming part of the saddle, or the saddle was becoming part of me, either way it was a painful experience! Not to mention the ‘slight’ pain of consecutive days riding. To me this was normal. Then something that I can only describe as a complete game-changer happened. I discovered Stolen Goat. Yes I’m a Brand Ambassador however I write this blog completely impartial because the simple fact that I am an ambassador does not take away that on discovering Stolen Goat I discovered the key to a comfortable ride. 

With summer months approaching but still a little chilly I opted to buy some new bib shorts, I decided on the Women’s Orkaan waterproof shorts.

I love them.

Now as an amateur I’m not going to go in to too much technical detail because I’m still learning myself. 

But here is what makes Stolen Goat Orkaan Waterproof Bib Shorts so great: 

Waterproof fabric – the waterproofing is manufactured into the material and so no amount of washing will affect its performance.

Wind resistant – considered more wind resistant than other bib shorts.

Proprietary Pad – using dimple technology to increase airflow these bib shorts have been developed in Belgium alongside top level pro riders and so quality is guaranteed.

Premium fit – what I like about these compared to the first shorts I owned is that the legs are held in place by elasticated bands so that they hold in place throughout the ride instead of using silicon grippers which can be uncomfortable as well as irritating!

With London Revolution approaching I have been focusing on consecutive days in the saddle and these Stolen Goat shorts have made that possible. Not only are they comfortable and fit well but I love the SG logo and by choosing black I can pair with any cycling jersey (and yes I have just ordered another jersey from SG!)

These shorts are also waterproof. I have been lucky enough to avoid the rain but with our lovely British weather I’m sure it will only be a matter of weeks before they really are put to the test! 

If you are looking for some great performance bib shorts I would highly recommend Stolen Goat. 

Whether you are a beginner just setting out on your cycling journey and starting your cycling wardrobe, or you have more cycling kit than normal clothes. Whether you are going out on a leisurely Sunday ride or competing in a sportive, maybe you are clocking up the miles on a turbo or hitting the roads on a spring morning. Whatever your ride these are just the perfect kit.

An absolute essential for your cycling wardrobe.

Don’t just take my word for it, I am an amateur after all.
stolengoat.com

M x 

I am cycling the London Revolution 185 miles to raise pennies and awareness for the Shakespeare Hospice, a charity who do amazing things.

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Michelle-Mumford3

To Bib, or not to Bib that is the question?

Where did March go?

Well, March you showed up and disappeared pretty quickly! I’ll be honest and say I don’t feel that my training has overly progressed this month for one reason or another. I know I am writing this looking at the calendar and seeing that the end of April is fast approaching, time is flying, but better late than never! Sometimes things do get in the way and with a few months to spare it felt ok. Now with 4 weeks to go until the cycle there is no room for the downs of training. Time to focus and push forwards. 

I admit to having less time in the saddle at the start of the March as I was getting ready for Warwick Half Marathon so more running and less cycling. The following week after the half resulted in less cycling than I would have liked. However Warwick was amazing, I loved it and got that PB! Knocked 24 minutes off my last and 6 off my first. What I loved most about this half marathon was that I was running with friends from Run Like A Girl. It made all the difference running and chatting and before I knew it I was 10 miles in. I didn’t set out a certain time I wanted and I wasn’t aiming for a PB, I didn’t even look at my Garmin until the 10 mile mark. Taking that pressure off actually improved my performance and I enjoyed it much more!

Back to cycling then, I’ve been on some great longer runs in March and have got the mileage up to 54 miles with consecutive days in the saddle to try and get used to this kind of ride. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the longer rides and they have taken me to some beautiful places. 


I also got my amazing new bike which I absolutely love and wouldn’t change for the world. She has definitely made long distance rides more comfortable and I can’t wait to take her to the London Revolution.

Another exciting cycling related happening this month. Guess who is now a Brand Ambassador for Stolen Goat? Yes that’s right me! I never thought I’d be an ambassador for anything and can’t wait to get stuck in to this. Stolen Goat for those who don’t know are a great cycling brand for both men and women. I couldn’t be more happy with my kit, which I will post about later.

Take a look at their kit here 

stolengoat.com

So April is here and training has stepped up once again. I have my plan and I will be sticking to it religiously this month. All I want is to approach the London Revolution feeling as prepared as possible and ready. 

Before writing this blog I was thinking that March hadn’t been a great month but on reflection it’s not been so bad!

Now we are mid-way through April and I’m happy to say that training is going well.

Until next time,

M x 

Where did March go?

Positive motivation is everything.

Would you run a half marathon, on your own, in the pouring rain, with no encouragement and no one to motivate you? Maybe you would but it is hard work. 

Would you run a half marathon, with 40 running friends, in the pouring rain, with motivation, encouragement, support and the most amazing positive energy you can imagine? (Filled with smiles, laughs and selfies) Yes you would. I know which I would prefer.

As someone who has run a half marathon alone with no one around for encouragement I can tell you that ok so it may be possible, but it is in no way fun and it’s a tough mental battle from the start line. I am also lucky enough to have been in the 2nd scenario just yesterday.

The reason for my post isn’t to talk about any specific marathon or even running as a topic but what became evident to me yesterday as I crossed the finish line of Warwick Half Marathon is just how amazing and powerful it is to be part of a group of like minded people. People who pass on advice, discuss what to wear before a race, get excited together, meet at the start line, push each other through their mental barriers and then regroup at the finish line and share each other’s achievements and pride. That just sums up Run Like A Girl Leamington.

Before I joined a running group I couldn’t understand the appeal, but one session with the group and the love and support became apparent. You don’t just become a member of a running group you become a part of something much bigger. Without sounding soppy or cliched you do gain a family, a running family and the best of friends. I have made friends who I feel I have known for years, friendships that will last for years to come.

Before the run I had doubts, I worried that my injury wouldn’t hold out, that my legs were too tired before I started, that I’d have to stop, that I just wouldn’t do it. Being sat on the groups Facebook page the night before with everyone sharing their worries and others giving advice and showing support my nerves were eased and I just had a knowledge that it was going to be ok. The positivity of RLAG would be enough to get me round. Then on the morning of the race when the rain was lashing down and it was a truly miserable morning my annoyance at the weather didn’t last long when I met up with the ladies before the run. We were all frustrated with the rain but we were able to see the funny side and we were facing it together. During the run I didn’t have time to really doubt myself because I was running with and talking to the RLAG ladies and the time flew by. I won’t say it was easy because we all had our struggles and moments of weaknesses with challenges to face but the power of the group seemed to make that process easier. When you run on your own it is easy to let your mind take over and as humans we can be very critical of ourselves. Go for the same run with a few friends and you stop criticising yourself so much and focus on the positives and begin to enjoy it.

Even families get involved with one of the Running Leaders little girls making lots of little bags of sweets with motivational messages to hand out to the group as we ran round. Is that not amazing?

The route was filled with supporters but what made it even more motivating to get round was that those RLAG ladies who were not racing that day still came out, in the rain to support us and encourage us from the side lines. The support a running group can give you is endless. I don’t like calling it a group because to me these ladies are more than that they are friends. 

Now this isn’t a plug to get more members for RLAG and I’m not saying you need to go and join a group to be a successful runner because that’s not necessarily true. What I am saying is it is truly amazing what you can achieve when surrounded by the right people. Never underestimate the power of a group of women, never underestimate the power of a group of women wearing running shoes and definitely do not underestimate the power of the RLAG army.

Ladies you really are amazing and it’s an absolute pleasure to be a Running Leader for you.

M x 

Positive motivation is everything.

Looking back over February 

It feels like I have only just reviewed January, how fast is this year going?!

The answer… too fast. May and the London Revolution are fast approaching and I feel completely unprepared for what is to come!

My plan for February was to continue to build a solid cycling base with increasing mileage on the long ride day. Did I achieve this? Yes. Do I feel any more prepared? No.

I managed to get my weekly mileage to 130 miles which is a step in the right direction but still lots of work to do. 

My training took me to the Peak District this month which was fab. It would have been amazing had I not contracted man flu before we went and felt horrific. For someone who struggles to take rest days, all I really wanted (and needed) to do was cuddle up in bed and sleep. I didn’t even visit the FREE spa in the hotel so I knew I must have been ill! But the weekend was booked and it was too good an opportunity to not train so I did. 

The Peak District has some beautiful places and I was lucky enough to run around Ladybower reservoir, after the first kilometre I was surprised at how flat our route seemed considering where we were and became quietly comfortable… and then we took it off road. I never run trails. I never run on grass. In fact I never run anywhere that isn’t considered ‘road running’ but I was taken out of my comfort zone and facing some very hilly, muddy, spiralling and challenging trails. But I LOVED it. It was refreshing to go out and run without having one eye on the Garmin looking at distance and pace. It’s the first run in a while that wasn’t ‘on the plan’ and it felt good. Granted it would have been better had I been able to breathe!

The following day I was feeling worse, the little energy I did have had been zapped, my head hurt and I felt rubbish. The thought of a long road ride (after seeing the massive hills that we had to drive over to get to the hotel) wasn’t appealing at all. I didn’t feel confident enough in my ability to use clip ins when it was so hilly and while feeling like I did, the last thing I wanted was to fall off. So we decided to get the mountain bikes and head out off road. 

“Just a little ride to see some views and stretch the legs”

We had a route and a map and I’m sure it would have been a flat, easy ride had we not missed the turn and ended up having to come off the trail. What started as an easy flat route quickly became a hill training session and I came face to face with the biggest hill I’ve ever seen in my life. (No exaggeration). I did it, it hurt, I couldn’t breathe because of the flu which ultimately made me panic slightly but I did it…and there was nice food and coffee at the top! There was also a beautiful view which made it worthwhile. 

Joking aside, what this ride did teach me is that I seriously need to focus on nutrition and my normal attitude of ‘water is all I need while training’ is not going to get me anywhere now the mileage and intensity is increasing. Before we stopped for food my legs felt like jelly, I was lightheaded and felt exhausted and I know that was more than flu causing it. Nutrition is a big challenge for me but something I need to master over the next few months.

Needless to say that training through flu was a silly idea and I suffered for it after and forced to take a good few rest days. The dehydration was the worst and my first run back after my rest days was painful. From the start my calf muscles cramped and it physically hurt to run, this was demoralising and made me doubt the half marathon I will be doing this weekend. But putting the flu and bad runs to one side I’ve been training well for the Half Marathon (better than last years) I’ve done two 10 mile runs this month and so I am prepared. When you are having a bad week or something gets in the way of training it is so easy to forget the positives and focus on the negatives.

Plan for March:

My longest ride so far was completely last week 53 miles. March will be about continuing to increase this while doing long rides on consecutive days to get used to what I will be facing at the London Revolution. I also plan to focus on nutrition and try and make some progress here.

March also marks the start of full Marathon training, more about that another day.

Let’s not forget the reasons I am doing this:

I am riding the London Revolution Ride to raise money for the Shakespeare Hospice, a charity that works hard to provide support for children and adults with life limiting and serious illnesses. At Blue Skies we have pledged to raise a lot of money in 2017 and so I wanted to do this ride for them, to not only raise money but awareness to.

If you are reading this and would like to show your support please do donate. I’m not asking anyone to sponsor me for the ride, people do crazy challenges all the time but I am asking you to support a fab charity.

All you need to do is;

Text MICM89

With your amount be it £1 or £10 

To 70070
Or visit my just giving page

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Michelle-Mumford3 
M x 

Looking back over February 

Giving the silent illness a voice

With Eating Disorder Awareness Week taking place next week 27th – 5th March it’s a little reminder just how crucial awareness of this ‘silent’ illness is. Eating disorders are a very secretive illness. Using myself as an example, to begin with I looked fine, my favourite phrase was ‘I’m fine’ or ‘I’m ok’ and I acted fine and my behaviour was fine. On the outside everything was OK. As the illness progresses it begins to take its toll and it’s clear to people around you that you are not indeed ‘fine’ but by this point it’s too late, the damage is done, the thoughts and feelings are ingrained and have taken deep root. These thoughts and feelings are no longer thoughts and feelings but they are the truth, they are fact and you believe them. Belief is the key here. If you believe something to be true then no matter what your friends or family or the doctors say to you, you won’t believe them. You know the truth. Everyone else is lying to you. That’s when the paranoia begins, everyone and everything is against you, you feel on edge when you walk in to the room and everyone goes quiet… or worse overly chatty. Clearly everyone was talking about you. Against you. This is when you no longer look fine, your behaviour speaks volumes but it’s too late. This is the point where people may try to help you, where you are forced to see a doctor. I did exactly that and only agreed to see a doctor to make my family happy and stop them worrying. I didn’t see the problem and didn’t think I was poorly enough to get help. When it slowly clicked I was terrified but I felt like it was too late. I wished that I’d seen the problem at the very beginning so that I could have received the help I needed before things got too bad but I didn’t. No-one noticed the signs and that’s because I was so good at hiding it, I had all of the excuses, all of the lies and I manipulated. No-one knew what was going on and why should they? Eating disorders were not talked about so freely and so how could anyone have noticed the signs so early on when I was fighting so hard to keep it hidden.

Awareness of eating disorders is so so important and by people talking about mental health and understanding the early warning signs better places family and friends to make the intervention. It’s sad but true that this lies with family and friends because your loved one cannot be trusted to help themselves, that is not the nature of an eating disorder. 

Recovery from an eating disorder is not a quick fix, you don’t get help and then you are better again, it takes years of hard work and in many cases you never fully recover BUT the sooner you get support and the treatment needed the sooner you can stop the downward spiral and begin working towards recovery. 

Whether it’s the beginning of an eating disorder or a third or forth relapse getting help quickly is the most important thing.

I’m no professional but from personal experiences I have identified the early warning signs. If a handful of people are reading this and take something you never know when or if you might need it.

Early warning signs, to name a few:

Preoccupation with food:

  • having ‘good’ and ‘bad’ foods
  • having a list of ‘safe’ foods
  • eliminating entire food groups
  • extreme interest in what others are eating
  • feeding other people 

Comments and thoughts around   weight, weighing themselves more frequently and a desire for the number to go down


Looking in the mirror more often than normal and touching or pinching body parts. 

If these phrases become part of your day to day conversations:

“I have already eaten”, ” I’ll eat later”, “I’m not hungry” “I don’t like that anymore” ” I had a big lunch”

Hiding food and throwing it away

Exercising obsessively with the intention of burning calories


Fixation on counting calories and numbers, checking food labels or knowing the calorie content in almost every food

Supermarket shops become painful, time consuming and stressful

Spending more time on the internet looking at diet sites and forums 

Anxiety and depression

Having a few outfits that are worn and washed constantly and only feeling comfortable in these. They tend to be loose fitting

Becoming defensive and snappy and angry with intense mood swings. Becoming angry for what seems like no reason and then being tearful the next.

Rigid eating behaviours:

  • using a certain bowl or spoon
  • cutting food into tiny pieces 
  • chewing a certain number of times
  • not letting foods touch

Avoiding social situations or being socially awkward and withdrawing and becoming isolated

Being cold and tired all the time

The more we talk and read about eating disorders the greater awareness there will be, with more people getting the help that they need. Eating disorders are silent… we need to give them a voice, we need to make them loud.
M x 

Giving the silent illness a voice